This year’s Scottish CCFG visit is to Trees for Life’s Dundreggan Rewilding Centre to look at the ideas and practices behind the work the organisation’s rewilding project. The 4,000ha estate comprises a mix of remnant Caledonian pine woodland and other native woodland including a significant amount of juniper, a new native woodland and open hill land. Trees for Life also have a native woodland nursery specialising in growing higher altitude species.

The visitor services team have arranged a day visit for us which will look at the nursery and the existing woodland. The challenges of establishing successful native species regeneration with deer pressures and competing vegetation will be a theme common to all foresters. We will be able to see over the native woodland planting but there will not be time to go into it. We will also have a chance to find out more about the approach of Trees for Life, discuss their approach to public engagement and awareness and not forgetting the lessons from the cultural landscape round about.

Trees for Life do make a charge for tours. CCFG will meet part of the cost for members.

To make a booking please use this link 

Arrangements

Timings

10.00am – 4.00pm

Please be ready to start at 10am. We will finish by 4pm at the latest.

If you need to be away before 4pm please let Polly know so that you can be on the nursery tour in the afternoon as this is close to the car park.

Meeting point is in the foyer inside the Centre

Charge

There will be a change for this visit which CCFG will partially cover leaving a charge of £15 for members (£5 for students) to be paid in advance. Non-members will be asked to pay the full per head cost of £27. 

Site conditions

The walk through the woodland is on a narrow, rough hill path rising to c300m, wet in places. Please wear suitable footwear and clothing. There are alternative lower level surface paths around the Centre if you are unable to do the hill walk which would be self guided.

Biosecurity

As usual please ensure footwear is clean before coming on the visit. This is particularly important because of the nursery element.

Facilities

There is plenty of parking at the Centre

There are also toilets at the centre

Lunch

There is a café at the centre but bringing your own lunch is advised as the café is unlikely to be able to cope with a large demand at lunch time within the time we have allocated. However, it is open between 9.30 and 4.30 so if you arrive early or can stay on then coffee and cake can be purchased.

Booking arrangements

The numbers will be strictly capped to 40 as the tours can only accommodate a maximum of 20 people. We will split into 2 groups for 2 half day tours swapping over at lunch time. One tour looking at the Centre and the Nursery and the other walking in the woods. Places should be booked in advance and are allocated on a first come first serve basis.

If you book and are then unable to come please let Polly (administrator@ccfg.org.uk) know so that the place can be reallocated.

Study Tour To Ireland – Implementing CCF In Eastern Ireland

Wednesday 27th – Saturday 30th September 2023

We are delighted to announce that we plan to run a study tour to Ireland from Wednesday 27th – Saturday 30th September 2023, in conjunction with Pro Silva Ireland.

SILVICULTURE IN IRELAND

Forestry in Ireland has a similar history to that in Great Britain, with widespread deforestation up until the 20th century followed by an extensive reforestation programme based largely on the use of non-native species such as Sitka spruce. More recently, there have been increasing policy commitments to greater use of native species and to the wider use of Continuous Cover Forestry. For example, in 2019, a new grant scheme dedicated to supporting CCF was introduced by the Irish government. This forms part of wider measures designed to supporting the sustainability and resilience of Irish forests.

Pro Silva Ireland was founded in 2000 and now has over 100 members drawn from all parts of the Irish forest sector.

Our visit will be based in County Wicklow to the south west of Dublin and within easy access of Dublin airport and other means of public transport.

The indicative cost is £400 per person and will include your bus and excursions, three nights accommodation, three breakfasts, three packed lunches and two evening meals (note the Wednesday evening meal is not included, to allow you to travel at your own convenience and arrange to eat en route or when you arrive at the hotel at your own expense).
You will need to arrange and pay for your own travel but please do not book yet!

Please see the full Ireland – Outline programme and booking form for further information. Register to attend by completing the form included which should be sent to: administrator@ccfg.org.uk

Please note, we have a maximum of 20 places in total, so please complete the registration form early to avoid disappointment.

Non-members may also apply. 

STUDENT PLACES

We are also offering two subsidised places to student members, which will cost £100 each (in addition to arranging your own travel). If you would like to be considered for one of these places, please email administrator@ccfg.org.uk with a statement (1 side of A4/ 500 words) explaining exactly why you as an individual would like to attend this study tour, with as many details as possible. The deadline for this is also 18th August. 

Date: Saturday 7th October 2023
Location: Wales – Coed Fron Drain and Bwlch y Mynydd, nr Mold, Flintshire
Meeting Time: 10:00am


Description:

We will visit a mixed farm woodland (PAWS) that has recently had second thinning and enrichment planting, where a marteloscope has been installed for training farmers and forestry students in single stem selection.

The second site we will visit is a larger private forestry estate with compartments of monoculture plantation Douglas fir, Sitka spruce and larch, regenerating cherry with some areas of PAWS with remnant broadleaves. An ISN research stand has been established in one of the compartments having a thinning history. The owner is considering different options to transform the plantation to continuous cover. The meeting will be hosted by the two forest owners and Jonathan Hulson (North Wales Wildlife Trust) and Phil Morgan (Sustainable Forest Management Ltd).

We will have lunch at the first site and drive to the second site in convoy. We expect to finish by 2.30pm, walking distance approx 4km. There are no toilets on site.

We advise you to bring a packed lunch and clothing to suit any weather we may encounter.

Spaces are limited so please book early to avoid disappointment.

Booking:

To book your space to attend this event please complete our booking form: Here

Contact:

If you have any questions please contact: administrator@ccfg.org.uk.

CCFG will be hosting their next webinar – Developing permanent irregular forest structures: Lessons from Faskally Forest

with Andrew Cameron, Thursday 29th June 2023 4-5pm

This online event is hosted by CCFG featuring Andrew Cameron who will deliver a 30 minute presentation on this topic. This will be followed by a question and answer session for participants.

The Faskally Forest transformation was established in 1953 by Prof Mark Anderson of Edinburgh University with the aim of creating a permanent irregular forest based on European plenter stands. The original forest dates back to the early part of the twentieth century as a planted mixture of Norway spruce, Scots pine, European larch, Douglas fir, and European beech. At the start of the transformation in the 1950s, gaps created in the canopy were established using a combination of natural regeneration and planting of predominately shade/semi-shade-tolerant Douglas fir, Norway spruce, western hemlock, and European beech, and smaller proportions of shade-intolerant Scots pine, European larch, and silver birch. The study at this time was primarily viewed as a learning process to determine what does and does not work.

Records of the study from the early 1960s to the late 1980s are sparse, although some input into the area had taken place over this period. Increased interest in irregular forestry from the late 1980s saw a return to more intensive management of the site, and by the early 1990s the area was managed under the selection system.

A one hectare permanent sample plot was established in 1997 by the University of Aberdeen to study the latter stages of the transformation. Complete inventories of the sample plot were carried out at six year intervals starting in 1997 and subsequently in 2003, 2009, 2015, and 2021. In this seminar, Andrew will present an overview of the study spanning a period of almost 25 years. It will describe the development of stand structure and species composition and contrast a range of stand metrics with data from established Continental plenter forests.

Andrew Cameron is a senior lecturer in the Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences at the University of Aberdeen. His career has spanned practical forest management, research, and education. His forest management experience started with the Forestry Commission at Cowal Forest District in Argyll before moving to North York Moors Forest District in North Yorkshire.

He returned to the University of Aberdeen in 1989 to lecture in silviculture and forest planning. His research interests include how wood properties are influenced by silviculture and genetic selection, transformations of even-aged stands into irregular structures, use of alternative productive species, and the impact of climate change on forests.

He has advised governments in Holyrood and Westminster on various aspects of forest policy. He produced a report for the COP26 conference in Glasgow in 2021 on the importance of productive forests in climate change mitigation and in reducing natural and semi-natural forest loss. He has recently made presentations at three Westminster Parliamentary committees on forest expansion and climate change. He has over 80 peer reviewed publications.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ATTEND YOU CAN BOOK YOUR TICKET HERE

CCFG Event

Date: 27th April 2023
Location: Starts in Lyndhurst, New Forest


Description:

The course aims to explore options for CCF management with broadleaved species. 

***This course is currently only open to CCFG Members, Cost £140***

CONTINUOUS COVER FORESTRY COURSE INFORMATION

A 3-hour indoor session will introduce variious aspects of CCF in broadleaves. The afternoon site visit includes a number of exercises to assess the potential for transformation to CCF on a number of sites. Course location is the New Forest, meeting at the Forestry England office at Lyndhurst. 

COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

More information to follow. 

CONSIDERATIONS WE SHOULD MAKE PARTICIPANTS AWARE OF:

The afternoon will be spent on field visits in the forest. There will be no toilet facilities available during that time. Transport between field visit stops by car. Walking distances are generally short but up to 1.5 miles on one occasion. Walking will include rough ground. Suitable footwear and weather-proof clothing are essential, eye protection is advisable. 

Spaces are limited to 12 participants so please book early to avoid disappointment.


Contact: administrator@ccfg.org.uk if you have any questions.

We currently have 12 places available to CCFG members. Contact us urgently to register your interest.

Cost: £140 per delegate

Booking: Book your space for this course HERE

 

CCFG will be hosting their next webinar – An expedition through Kalebsburg Forest

with Hinrich Bärwald, Thursday 23rd March 2023, 2pm – 3pm

This online event is hosted by CCFG featuring Hinrich Bärwald who will deliver a 30 minute presentation on this topic. This will be followed by a question and answer session for participants.

For our first ever live event from a forest, we will walk through Kalebsberg Forest with the owner Mr. Holger Weinauge. Hinrich Bärwald will accompany him with his iPhone.

The following topics will be discussed:

      • Privatization after reunification
      • Consistent conversion to permanent forestry
      • Measures for effective hunting
      • Silvicultural measures to prepare for climate change
      • AFI plot and marteloscopes
      • Forestry certificate based on the ANW principles (permanent forest)

 

Our Guest forester from Germany who will lead the day is Hinrich Joost Bärwald

Hinrich manages 6,000 ha of privately owned forest in the north of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (Germany) with an annual harvesting rate of ca. 30,000 cubic metres. He is the Chairman of the forestry association in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, and also the Chairman of the ANW (nature based forest management) – Country group for Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (www.anw-mv.de) and a board member of ANW (Germany). Hinrich is also managing director of the local forest management cooperative Behrenwalde Bad Doberan. 

Our host Holger Weinauge owns Kalebsburg Forest, a 290 ha forest close to “Burg Schlitz” Castle, which he bought after the reunification of Germany. He also developed a close to nature certification system, which is based on the ANW rules in Germany. Holger also manages a 3,300 ha privately owned forest in the middle of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (Germany) with an annual harvesting rate of ca. 10-15,000 cubic metres. He is a board member of the forestry association  of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and managed the local forest management cooperative Waldverein Bansow.

To view the location of the forest, use this link

For more background reading on German forests, please use this link

 

Date:

28th – 30th September 2023

Location: Ireland
Description

We are delighted to announce that we plan to run a study tour to Ireland from Thursday 28th September to Saturday 30th September 2023, in conjunction with Pro Silva Ireland.

SILVICULTURE IN IRELAND

Forestry in Ireland has a similar history to that in Great Britain, with widespread deforestation up until the 20th century followed by an extensive reforestation programme based largely on the use of non-native species such as Sitka spruce. More recently, there have been increasing policy commitments to greater use of native species and to the wider use of Continuous Cover Forestry. For example, in 2019, a new grant scheme dedicated to supporting CCF was introduced by the Irish government. This forms part of wider measures designed to supporting the sustainability and resilience of Irish forests.

Pro Silva Ireland was founded in 2000 and now has over 100 members drawn from all parts of the Irish forest sector.

Our visit will be based in County Wicklow to the south west of Dublin and within easy access of Dublin airport and other means of public transport.

Open to non CCFG Members also!

Contact:

Further details to follow however please get in touch if you are interested in attending.

administrator@ccfg.org.uk

CCFG will be hosting their next webinar – A long-term study of transformation to CCF in Sitka spruce in Ireland

with Ted Wilson, Thursday 23rd February 23, 4pm – 5pm

This online event is hosted by CCFG featuring Ted Wilson who will deliver a 30 minute presentation on this topic. This will be followed by a question and answer session for participants.

There is growing interest in the wider adoption of continuous cover forestry (CCF) in Ireland. This is linked strongly to woodland owner preferences for closer-to-nature forest management, climate adaptation policy and wider societal drivers for functionally diverse woodlands that deliver multiple ecosystem services. The key technical and professional challenge is the transformation of productive Sitka spruce plantations. To address this issue, a research project was initiated in 2010 by University College Dublin (UCD) which established the first long-term study in early-stage stand transformation that compared three types of thinning regime, low (conventional) thinning, crown thinning and graduated density thinning. The latter two represent “transformation pathways” with potential for application on a range of sites. The research has been sustained through the LISS project (2010-2014), TranSSFor Project (2017-2022) and the ContinuFor project (2022-2027). Partners include UCD, Maynooth University and Teagasc. Parallel to the research programme has been an extensive series of training and knowledge transfer courses and events, much of which is delivered in partnership with Pro Silva Ireland. In this presentation, Ted will present an overview of the study, some preliminary results and demonstrate the links between applied research and training.

Biography

Edward (Ted) Wilson is a silviculturist who specialises in the sustainability, resilience and conservation of temperate and boreal forests. His career has been multi-faceted, with roles in forest management, public policy, research and education. He has worked in Canada, the UK and Ireland, and held posts with several organisations, including the Canadian Forest Service, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, UK Forestry Commission, the Royal Forestry Society and Teagasc. He has delivered projects in more than 15 countries. Ted’s research interests are in the areas of tree biology, woodland establishment and silvicultural systems, especially continuous cover forestry (CCF). His current focus is the transformation of even-aged Sitka spruce stands to irregular structure forests. Working closely with colleagues in several organisations, he delivers an ongoing series of workshops and courses on CCF, especially tree marking, biodiversity conservation and management. Ted is adjunct professor of silviculture at the Institute of Forestry and Conservation, University of Toronto, is a Technical Member of the Society of Irish Foresters, and Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology.

Wilson, E. R., I. Short and Á. Ní Dhubháin. 2023. A long-term study of transformation to CCF in Sitka spruce in Ireland. Webinar. Continuous Cover Forestry Group. 23 February 2023.

Continuous Cover past present and future. Is it time to make more noise?
With Dr Alec Dauncey


Following our most recent successful webinar we have now made a recording available on YouTube for anyone that missed it or would like to revisit: VIEW NOW ON YOUTUBE

Where are we up to in promoting Continuous Cover approaches? Greater use of Continuous Cover, or closer to nature methods, has been ‘on the agenda’ for about thirty years. Encouraging greater use of CCF has been part of the policies of governments around the UK and is part of the UK Forestry Standard and UK Woodland Assurance Standard. But has there been enough adoption of it, for the good of the resilience and ecosystem services from UK forests? What can we do?

Alec Dauncey Biography

Alec is a Lecturer at Bangor University having completed a PhD in British 20th Century forestry policy in 2016. Founder member of CCFG and participant in various ProSilva meetings and tours in the 1990s. Forest District manager in Wales implementing CCF in forest design plans. Worked as a Special Adviser to Welsh Government Ministers seeking to increase use of CCF in Wales in 2002. Defra UK/England and international Forestry Policy 2003-2008. 

Please contact Michelle at administrator@ccfg.org.uk if you have any questions.

CCFG will be hosting their next webinar – Wind Stability and Irregular Forest Stand Structures

with Barry Gardiner Thursday 27th October 4pm – 5pm

This online event is hosted by CCFG featuring Barry Gardiner who will deliver a 30 minute presentation on this topic. This will be followed by a question and answer session for participants.

Barry Gardiner Biography

Barry Gardiner is a senior researcher at the Institut Européen de la Forêt Cultivée (IEFC) in France, a researcher at the University of Freiburg, German, and an honorary research fellow at Forest Research. He has a particular interest in different abiotic risks to forests. His research focus has been primarily on wind and snow damage to forests, and he developed a forest wind/snow risk model that has been adapted for use in many countries. From 1987 to 2011 he worked at Forest Research in Scotland on wind risk to forests and the influence of forest management on timber quality. From 2011 to 2015 he worked as a Senior Scientist at INRA Bordeaux on a 4-year scientific package entitled “Wind Damage to Forests in a Changing Climate: Impacts and Mitigation” and from 2016 to 2019 he worked as a senior researcher at the EFI Planted Forests Facility. He currently is working on various projects focused on multiple risks to forests and how to incorporate risk management into forest management practice. He is Associate Editor of Annals of Forest Science and Frontiers in Forests and Global Change, and Coordinator of IUFRO Group 8.03.06 “Impact of wind on forests”. He is an author on more than 100 scientific papers and has edited 3 books. He was awarded Docteur Honoris Causa de l’Université Laval de Québec in June 2016.